New Faculty

New Faculty

The College of Arts and Letters would like to welcome its newest faculty members. These talented scholars will begin teaching at the start of the 2020/2021 academic year.

Meet our newest faculty members who make the College of Arts & Letters a great place to be:

Andrés Ehecatl Aguilar
Department of Chicana and Chicano Studies
Ph.D., University of California, San Diego, 2020

Andrés Ehecatl Aguilar, Ph.D. is trained as a linguist and is an expert on Mesoamerican cultural practices and aesthetics.  He works closely with Indigenous communities in the United States and Mexico and has conducted extensive research on Chicontepec Náhuatl and Ja’a Kumiai. A lifelong dancer and teacher in the Danza Azteca-Chichimeca-Conchera tradition, he has experience in performance and theater production, choreography, lighting, graphic, and regalia design. As a scholar/artist who grew up on the U.S.-Mexico border, Andrés continuously crosses borders in his academic, artistic, and community work.

Andrés Ehecatl Aguilar

 

April Anson
Department of Classics and Humanities
Ph.D., University of Oregon, 2019

April Anson is an Assistant Professor in the the Department of Classics and Humanities whose specialty is in Public Humanities.  She was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania in the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities. She holds a Ph.D. in Literature and Environment and an American studies certificate from the University of Oregon, and comes to the public humanities from the intersection of the environmental humanities and American studies, paying special attention to Indigenous studies, racial formation, and political theory. Her first book project both theorizes the relationship between white supremacy, American environmental thought, and literary genre, while also identifying an early and unbroken Indigenous environmental justice tradition capable of informing our narrative considerations of climate change today. Her work has appeared in Resilience, Environmental History, Western American Literature, and others.

April Anson

 

Yuki Arita 
Department of Linguistics and Asian/Middle Eastern Languages
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2015

Yuki Arita teaches Japanese and specializes in conversation analysis in Japanese talk-in-interaction. She received her Ph.D. in Japanese linguistics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research interests include the analysis of human interactions utilizing both linguistic and non-linguistic, multimodal resources. In her recent research, Yuki focuses on the interactional phenomenon of enactment, wherein conversation participants act out themselves or others to accomplish communication goals. She is also conducting research on interactions between native and non-native speakers of Japanese, examining how their native/non-native identities became relevant during ongoing conversations. With co-researchers, she is working on textbook analysis, exploring the importance of pedagogy reflecting language use in real-life interactions.

Yuki Arita

 

Gregory A. Daddis
Department of History
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2009

Gregory A. Daddis is the new director of the Center for Military History, the USS Midway chair in Modern U.S. Military History, and a professor of history. Daddis joined SDSU after directing the M.A. program in War and Society Studies at Chapman University. Prior, he served as the Chief of the American History Division in the Department of History at the United States Military Academy at West Point. A retired U.S. Army colonel, he deployed to both Operations Desert Storm and Iraqi Freedom. Daddis specializes in the history of the Vietnam Wars and the Cold War era and has authored five books, including Pulp Vietnam: War and Gender in Cold War Men's Adventure Magazines (2020) and Withdrawal: Reassessing America’s Final Years in Vietnam (2017). He has also published numerous journal articles and several op-ed pieces commenting on current military affairs, to include writings in the New York Times, the Washington Post, and National Interest magazine.

Gregory A. Daddis

 

Blas Falconer
Department of English and Comparative Literature
Ph.D., University of Houston, 2002

Blas Falconer is the author of three poetry collections, including Forgive the Body This Failure, and a coeditor of two essay collections, The Other [email protected]: Writing Against a Singular Identity and Mentor and Muse: Essays from Poets to Poets. His poems have been featured by Poetry, Poetry Northwest, Harvard Review, Verse Daily, Poetry Daily, Poetry Society of America, the Academy of American Poets, and The New York Times, among other literary journals and institutions. His awards include an NEA Fellowship, the Maureen Egen Writers Exchange, and a Tennessee Individual Artist Grant.  He is a poetry editor for The Los Angeles Review and Mentor and Muse (online).

Blas Falconer

 

Genco Guralp
Department of Philosophy
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 2017

Genco Guralp received his Ph.D. in philosophy at Johns Hopkins University. He works mainly on the history and philosophy of science, and his primary research interests are in the history and philosophy of cosmology, philosophy of physics, and the historical epistemology of science. His research focuses on understanding how experimental episodes and practices succeed in generating valid experimental results, which, in turn, are put forward as evidence for scientific theories. His first book project aims to probe these questions in the context of the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe. He also has current projects in science studies and the sociology of science, more specifically, on the question of expertise and epistemic authority, and issues related to interdisciplinarity. His work has appeared in the European Journal for Philosophy of Science, Studies in History and Philosophy of Science, and various edited volumes.

Genco Guralp

 

Vijayanka Nair
Department of Anthropology
Ph.D., New York University, 2018

Vijayanka Nair is a sociocultural anthropologist. Her current book project focuses on biometric identification technologies and the state in South Asia. Prior to joining SDSU, Nair was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at UW-Madison, and a Fellow at The New School’s India-China Institute. She holds a Ph.D. in anthropology from New York University and an MPhil in social anthropological analysis from the University of Cambridge. Nair received an M.A. in sociology and a B.A. in philosophy from Delhi University. Her research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and the Social Science Research Council, among others.

 

Vijayanka Nair

 

Jacob Penglase
Department of Economics
Ph.D., Boston College, 2018

Jacob Penglase holds a Ph.D. in Economics from Boston College. Prior to joining SDSU, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Bordeaux and an associate economist at Analysis Group. His research focuses on measuring poverty and individual well-being. His past work has examined consumption inequality among children in the context of child fostering in Malawi. More recent research studied the relationship between poverty and household size in Bangladesh. His work has appeared in Economic Development and Cultural Change.

Jacob Penglase

 

Consuelo Carr Salas
Department of Rhetoric and Writing Studies
Ph.D., University of Texas at El Paso, 2017

Consuelo Salas is an Assistant Professor of Rhetoric and Writing Studies whose specialty is in Border Rhetorics. As a visual rhetorician and a food studies scholar, her areas of interest include commodification and representations of Mexican and Mexican Americans to U.S. based audiences within “food spaces.” Her areas of interest also include foodways rhetoric, the scholarship of teaching and learning, and information literacy. Dr. Salas is at work on a book that critically explores images associated with the cultural imaginary of Mexico and the images’ relationship to food and identity. Dr. Salas's co-edited collection [email protected]’ Presence in the Food Industry: Changing How We Think About Food, published with University of Arkansas Press, was awarded the Gourmand World Cookbook third best in the world in the category of Professionals in 2017. Her work can also be found in edited collections, such as Visual Imagery, Metadata, and Multimodal Literacies Across the Curriculum and Food, Feminisms, Rhetorics, as well as in peer reviewed journals, such as the Community Literacy Journal.  

Consuelo Salas

 

Naseh Nasrollahi Shahri
Department of Linguistics and Asian/Middle Eastern Languages
Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University

Naseh Nasrollahi Shahri received his Ph.D. in applied linguistics from The Pennsylvania State University. Before joining the Department of Linguistics and Asian/Middle Eastern Linguistics at SDSU, he was a faculty member at American University, Washington, D.C.

Broadly, his research lies at the intersection of language, culture and education. More specifically, he pursues interdisciplinary research into the role of identity, affect and social interaction in second language learning and literacy development. A second line of his research investigates methodography, in particular the question of how qualitative data collection and analysis shape knowledge construction. His research has appeared in various leading journals including TESOL Quarterly, System, Language Learning Journal, Language and Intercultural communication and Teachers and Teaching.

At SDSU he will coordinate the composition program for international students and teach courses in the theory and practice of second language teaching as well as the sociocultural dimensions of literacy.

 Naseh Nasrollahi Shahri

 

David Wallace-Hare
Department of Classics and Humanities
Ph.D., University of Toronto, 2020

David Wallace-Hare is the 2020-2022 Friends of Classics and Barbara Schuch Endowed Postdoctoral Fellow in Classics and Digital Humanities. He received his B.A. (2010) and M.A.(2012) in Classics from McMaster University and Ph.D. (2020) in Classics from the University of Toronto. In 2019-2020, he was the Crake Doctoral Fellow in Classics at Mount Allison University (New Brunswick, Canada). Dr. Wallace-Hare is a specialist in Roman environmental history, Latin epigraphy, and provincial material culture. His doctoral work examined the effect of boom industries like mining and quarrying on indigenous deity selection in Aquitanian mining districts in order to study indigenous dynamism and economic resilience in the Roman west. Since 2018, Dr. Wallace-Hare has been an investigator on the HESPERIA: Palaeohispanic Languages Data Bank, an ongoing epigraphic project at the Universidad del País Vasco. The Hesperia Project documents the survival and change of indigenous languages in the Iberian Peninsula such as Celtiberian and Lusitanian. Dr. Wallace-Hare is involved with the project’s expansion to the Roman province of Gallia Lugudunensis.

 

 David Wallace-Hare

 

New Dean - Monica J. Casper

To learn more about Monica, please see her bio and Q&A